This Week, I Read Jonathan Bell: Hello

Image Credit: Jon Tyson “In my head it always sounds better,” the speaker in Jonathan Bell’s self-published debut collection of poems, Hello, says. “Here, on mere parchment, the dimensions crumple what I see into clichés and paper tigers. I suppose I’m good at origami. It comes out raw and wrapped in red tape.” The pieces…

this week, i read rob mclennan: A halt, which is empty

Image Credit: Noah Näf via Unsplash “Listing, and in consequence. Whip-smart. Porcelain, imprints. Restless,/in what seemed. Eternity. A printed image. Transmitting, sparks,” the speaker in “[entirety, the edge of sky, scrapes]” says in rob mclennan’s collection, A halt, which is empty. Most of the poems in the collection are fragmentary. Literally, they are made up…

This Week, I Read Sascha Akhtar: #LoveLikeBlood

Image Credit: NASA via Unsplash This week, I read Sascha A. Akhtar’s book, #LoveLikeBlood, a colorful collection of hybrid and collage poems. The pieces experiment with form, and some of them are pastiches of words and phrases, cut out and glued together to create an interesting visual effect, lending themselves to the chaos and fragmentary…

This Week, I Read Emilie Sion: Swan Country

Image Credit: Rafal Grzegorz via Unsplash This week, I read Swan Country, by Emilie Sion, a Vancouver-based poet, who wrote during the 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s. In the preface to the book, it says: “She was fascinated by the connection between the spirit and the real world and much of her poetry could perhaps be…

This Week, I Read Charlene Elsby: Hexis

Image Credit: Chaozzy Lin via Unsplash “I wanted to see him as he used to be, as the memory that still lived in the space, and I wanted to show him that I was better now, so much better. If he only knew me now instead of then he wouldn’t have, and I wouldn’t have…

This Week, I Read Sarah Etlinger: Never One for Promises

Image Credit: Sergey Zolkin, via Unsplash This week, I read Sarah Etlinger’s Never One for Promises. This collection of poems is delightfully sexy and absolutely stunning. Etlinger uses cutting pears or the shape of chili peppers as metaphors to discuss relationships in a way that is both original and insightful. In another piece, she describes…

This Week, I Read Brian Fuchs: Okie Dokie

Image Credit: Mark Muhlberger via Unsplash “When our stories are all written, will we understand the languages in which they’ve been written? I find my own language so difficult, and I worry about understanding the bonfires we all set for ourselves, the interest we take in pomelos, carrots, cabins, the sun, or which tea goes…