This Week, I Read Vanessa Maki’s Haunted Mind

Image Credit: MontyLov via Unsplash *Content Warning: The book reviewed contains discussion of suicidal thoughts and self-harm.* For the record, I will always promote books which discuss taboo subjects in a way that is meaningful and seeks to shed light on those subjects. Haunted Mind is one such book. “i’m your//devourer / your chaos /…

This Week, I Read Kathryn Gossow’s The Dark Poet

Image Credit: Annie Spratt via Unsplash Most of the time, people misuse the word “seems.” They mean that something looks a certain way, when they mean to say that it definitely looks the way that they’ve described. “Seem” should be used when something looks a certain way, but lurking beneath its surface, it’s actually another…

This Week, I Read Catherine Garbinsky’s Even Curses End

Image Credit: freestocks.org via Unsplash “I did not belong in the village/ where people would point and laugh,” the speaker in Catherine Garbinsky’s fairytale themed poetry collection, Even Curses End. “They did not see my robin’s egg heart/only the crooked branches of my body.” The pieces in this book tend to flip the narrative, telling…

This Week, I Read Alison Jones’s Heartwood

Image Credit: Micah Hallahan via Unsplash “Failing is fine, the best part of the heartwood is where you are going, with dead friends, passing through like falling mist,” the speaker assures the reader in Alison Jones’s chapbook, titled Heartwood.  The heartwood is the innermost part of a tree, which yields the hardest timber. In the…

This Week, I Read Mela Blust’s Skeleton Parade

Image Credit: Andrés Gómez via Unsplash “As children// we are /terrified of the monsters/under our beds//and as adults,/we willingly lie//beside them,” the speaker says in Mela Blust’s debut collection of poems, entitled Skeleton Parade. Skeleton Parade is a goth chic collection of poems about sexual abuse, the accompanying anguish, healing, and empowerment. Blust’s ability to…

This Week, I Read V.C. McCabe’s Give the Bard a Tetanus Shot

Image Credit: Justin Campbell via Unsplash “New York City poets see their muse’s reflection/in the shiny glass of towering skyscrapers,” the speaker in V.C. McCabe’s Appalachian Gothic collection of poems, entitled, Give the Bard a Tetanus Shot. “While here I sit in Appalachia—the point where/the Bible Belt’s buckle ever tightens the Rust Belt—/surrounded by nothing…

This Week, I Read Kate Garrett’s To Feed My Woodland Bones

Image Credit: Taylor@xoutcastx In To Feed My Woodland Bones, Kate Garrett defines a changeling as “a strange, ugly child/left in exchange for/a beautiful, wanted child.” Typically, the changeling is a fairy, who has been left in the place of a child. The stolen child has been taken to fairy, where he or she remains, forever….